BECOME AN ASTHMA HERO

…FOR SOMEONE YOU LOVE

If you’re like most of Asthma Australia’s supporters, you may have asthma yourself, or have someone in your life who suffers from it.

Sixty years ago, there were virtually no treatments for asthma.

Now there are.

But asthma can be deadly. More than 400 Australians a year are still dying from asthma and that’s simply not good enough.

That’s why I am asking you to become an Asthma Hero.

AS AN ASTHMA HERO YOU WILL

Join like-minded people determined to see

  • improvements in asthma care
  • greater freedom from the limits of asthma, and
  • an end to losing people we love to fatal asthma attacks.

AS AN ASTHMA HERO, YOU WILL HELP

YOU WILL RECEIVE

  • Regular updates on new treatments and services
  • The latest about any research or medication advances
  • A newsletter keeping you in touch
  • An annual receipt for taxation purposes that summarises your donations throughout the year.

To become an ASTHMA HERO, please nominate how much you would like to donate each month, and contact us on 1800 278 462 or email fundraising@asthma.org.au to set up your regular monthly gift.

(Most people give a gift of around 80 cents per day – about $24 – each month, paid safely and securely from their credit card or bank account.)

Regular Giving Direct Debit Service Agreement

Become an Asthma Hero for Caitlyn
and for the people you love
who are affected by asthma…

Caitlyn is 22, a professional violinist and self-employed crafter. And she has asthma – asthma so severe she can’t hold down a full-time job because she never knows when she’ll be too ill to go to work.

Caitlyn was diagnosed with eosinophilic asthma when she was very young. She has a monthly injection to help keep her asthma at bay.

“As a six year old I could not attend school and was home-schooled for 12 months. There is not a day that goes by when I don’t have symptoms. My sister said she’d never lose me in a crowd because she can always hear me coughing from a mile away.

I am on many different medications in an attempt to keep me stable. The new medication I am on has changed my life. I am so glad it’s working for me. But I still worry that it might stop working. That’s why research into new medications and treatments really matter.

I have a nebuliser and take breathing treatments. Even on maximum treatment my asthma puts me in hospital every few months and I have a flare up every four weeks or so. It would be amazing not to have the constant struggle with asthma. I hope in time with more research there will be a possible cure.”