Asthma Flare-Ups

Flare-ups do happen, and in children they are most often caused by colds and flu. These are almost impossible to avoid.

A flare-up is different to having asthma symptoms. They are generally more severe and require urgent medical attention. A sign that a flare-up is looming is where your child’s symptoms don’t respond to reliever medications, or return quickly after a dose.

Typically, if your child is having difficulty breathing, this is an urgent medical situation and needs to be treated quickly and properly. Whilst awaiting medical care, the child’s reliever medicine needs to be administered according to your child’s medical prescription or the 4x4x4 asthma first aid protocol.

As children are dependent on the supervision and care of those around them, we should all  learn asthma first aid. Your child should have access to a reliever puffer at all times. The video below shows you how to administer asthma first aid. You can do a training course in Asthma, First Aid and CPR through the accredited training and team.

Children with asthma can also spend periods of time away from home. It is important the people around your child are aware they have asthma. It is also important they know how to recognise asthma symptoms and what to do in an emergency. Parents can provide friends and family with a copy of their child’s Asthma Action Plan and asthma first aid information to help them prepare.

Children’s services  and  schools  play an important role in supporting children with asthma. They can also access  resources and  training  through Asthma Australia by calling 1800 ASTHMA (1800 278 462).

Every child with asthma should have an  Asthma Action Plan  which explains how to recognise worsening asthma, and what to do about it. By using an Asthma Action Plan, there is a change to prevent or reduce an asthma flare-up.